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Open your heart to spring

Thinking About Spring

According to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). true spring occurs in the midst of what we consider winter. Think about a crocus in the snow. There’s snow on the ground—so the temperature is cold—yet a flower has already bloomed. Energy has already pushed upward and outward through the hardened winter soil to create new life. This is the true energy of springtime—and as in nature, the same energy happens in your body. Within you, there is an energy moving up and outward, even your external temperature, which made you want to stay inside and rest. Ultimately, the climate will change to match the incoming seasonal energy.

Understanding Qi

According to TCM, each season has its own Qi, or energy, and this seasonal Qi allows change. In spring, Qi is mainly harnessed in the liver. Just as the energy of the growing crocus pushes through the ground, so does the Qi in your liver. Thus, if this is not in balance, our bodies will also feel strange as springtime arrives. The liver is responsible for maintaining the smooth flow of Qi and blood. It also helps our emotions flow smoothly; mood swings for example, can come from unbalanced liver Qi. Some other symptoms are headaches at the top of the head, high blood pressure, tendon problems, and eye issues, such as blurry vision, floaters,

dry or itchy eyes, or a change in vision. Since the liver has

a close relationship with the stomach, digestive issues like indigestion, bloating and burping can also occur, especially in springtime.

Balancing The Liver Qi

There are a few things you can do to help support your liver and make a smooth transition into Spring:

1. Stay calm: Take nice, long walks in the park or do other gentle exercises to relax your mind, body, and spirit.
2. If you drink alcohol, keep it in moderation, to preserve your liver’s energy and give it a break.
3. Stimulate your liver meridian by doing some targeted leg lifts and gentle exercises.

Recommended Diet:

1. As usual, try to eat seasonal foods. Green, leafy foods are good for the liver and have considerable amount of most nutrients in spring.
2. You can also increase pungent, sweet, or bitter foods.
3. Fresh fruits such as apricots, figs, grapes, pineapples, plums, apples, cherries, dates, and bananas are recommended.
4. Beans such as kidney beans, adzuki beans, yellow soybeans are best during this season.
5. If you eat fish or meat then choose beef, carp, duck, pork, and oysters.
6. Nuts and seeds such as sesame seeds and oil including black sesame seeds, sunflower seeds and oil, almonds, chestnuts, coconuts, and walnuts are wonderful for the liver at this time.

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